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10-12 Year Old Children's Lessons / Children's English Classes

Example Lesson Plan for 10-12 Childrens English Class

Without a map we can't get to where we want to go. For an English teacher the lesson plan is that map. It shows us where we will go and where we have already gone. Do you have a map for your 10-12 year old children's classes?No? Well then use this one.

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In this article you will find an example lesson plan for children’s English classes with students from the ages of 10 to 12.  The idea of this article is not to give you a one off lesson plan that you can only use one time in your classes. The idea is to give you a template that you can use to create other lesson plans. Here, the important thing is the structure of the lesson plan. You may have to change the individual key points or the difficulty of the English that you’re teaching but you certainly can use the same structure regardless of your students’ levels.

 

Age group

10-12 years old

 

Preparation

5 minutes

 

Class time

60-80 minutes

 

Teaching Key Point

Talking about likes and dislikes and favorites

“I like/dislike/love/hate ________.”

“Do you like ______?”

“Do you like ______ or _______?”

“What’s your favorite ______?”

“My favorite______ is _______.”

Adjectives

  • Boring
  • Exciting
  • Tall
  • Short
  • Big
  • Small
  • Clean
  • Dirty
  • Safe
  • Dangerous
  • Dumb
  • Smart

Lesson plan

Greetings

Warm-up-questions/conversation/review previous lesson

Textbook/Key Point introduction

Sample conversation

Simple sentence practice

Related game

Related vocabulary game

Previous lesson review game

Homework explanation

Goodbye

 

Step by Step

Greetings

Come into the class and greet the students with a simple “good morning” or a “how are you?”

Warm-up-questions/conversation/review previous lesson-

In this simple warm-up we are going to choose three or four students and ask them a few questions. The questions will be based on English the students learned in previous lessons.

 

Textbook/Key Point introduction

This lesson is looking at different ways to talk about likes and dislikes. We will also study a few adjectives so that the students can make simple sentences like “it is big”, “it is exciting”. In the end, we hope that the students can have a conversation like this:

Do you like ______ or _______?

I like ______

Why?

Because it’s ________.

We’re going to start by quickly reviewing “like” and “dislike”. For most students this is very easy and simple so we should have no problems. We are going to write a few example sentences on the board:

I like sushi.

I dislike tomatoes.

I’m also going to write some examples for “love” and “hate” as they are related.

I love steak.

I hate mushrooms.

Next, to double check that all the students understand the simple sentences I might go around the class and ask each student a simple question.

What food do you like?

What fruit do you not like?

Next, we are going to teach the students how to create a simple question using the word “like”. First I’m going to ask one the students:

“Do you like fish or chicken?”

If the student correctly answers I’ll go along to the next student and ask him similar type question. If the student has problems then I will help them answer by writing the question and the correct reply on the board. On the board I will write the following:

Do you like _______ or ________?

I will then tell the class that in the two blank areas they can say whatever they want. For example, “cat” and “dog” or “Tokyo” or “New York City”. If the class isn’t very shy then I might ask for different examples from the students. But if the class is shy and they can’t think of any examples and I will write three or four sentences using different examples.

“Do you like popcorn or potato chips?”

“Do you like summer or winter?”

“Do you like Italian food or Chinese food?”

After this explanation I’m going to take a look at the clock and if I have some time I’m going to explain how to use the word “favorite”. As this word is very similar to likes and dislikes I like to introduce it here. Again I will go to the board and write an example question:

“What’s your favorite food?”

Then I will ask the student the question. If they can’t answer the question then I will give them an example answer and write on the board.

“My favorite food is steak.”

Then I will ask the student again. Hopefully they can look at the board and look at the example answer and correctly reply. Next, I will write a different question using the same sentence patterns.

“What’s your favorite drink?”

Then I will ask another student. The student may or may not answer correctly. But what I want to focus on is changing the original example answers “food” to “drink”. I want them to understand that they have to change that word in the sentence as well. If the student correctly answers then I will write their answer the board. If they don’t, I will write another example answer on the board.

“My favorite drink is Coca-Cola.”

Sometimes I will tell the students to write down everything on the board and then I will tell them to write an explanation of the sentences they just wrote down in their own native language. This is important for whenever you want the students to review. Without the explanation in their own language it can be difficult for them to remember the exact meaning or slight nuances of all the English they learn. This will all depend on the class. If I think that it will take too much time I will skip this step. But, if the students are older and more experienced and I think that they can write everything down in a short amount of time I will tell them to go ahead and write it.

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Sample conversation

Next, we’re going to move on to the sample conversation. The sample conversation for this lesson is very simple. It has two basic conversations. The first one goes like this:

Mike: Do you live in Tokyo?

Susan: No, I live in Fukuyama.

Mike: Do you like it?

Susan: Yes, I do. It’s very quiet. I don’t like big cities. They are noisy.

The second conversation goes like this:

Mike: How about you, Ichiro? Do you like the countryside or big cities?

Ichiro: I live in Tokyo. It’s a very big city. I love it.

Mike: Why?

Ichiro: I think the countryside is boring.

We can see that the conversation is practicing the various questions and replies that we just taught the students. We can also see that we are introducing simple sentences using adjectives. This will come in handy later when we play an adjective vocabulary game.

I will choose a student to read one of the roles and I will read the other role. We will speak the roles out loud in front of the class while the other students follow along. Then I will separate the class into teams of two and tell them to read the conversation together. I will tell them to talk about the meaning of the sentences in the conversation. If there are any sentences or words they don’t understand they should ask the teacher. Then, when they feel that they understand everything they will take turns reading each role and practicing the conversation. The whole time that students are doing this I will walk around the class and check on each team and provide hints and suggestions.

I will give the students few minutes to do this together. Then I will ask questions about the conversation to each team. Some of the questions might go like this:

Does Susan live in Tokyo?

Where does Susan live?

Does she like it?

Why?

Where does Ichiro live?

Does he like the countryside or big cities?

Why?

You can do this in front of the entire class or when the students are working on the conversation together you can go around and ask each team separately some of these questions.

 

Simple sentence practice

Next, we’re going to move on to some simple sentence practice. Here they’re going to create sentences using what they just learned. In this class, I’m going to handout a paper with some questions on it. The students have to read the questions and write the correct reply.I will give the students about five minutes to do the questions. When they finish I will go around the class asking each student a different question and have them reply with their own answers. If the students make a mistake or are unable to reply then I will help them by writing some example answers on the board.

 

Related activity

Next , we’re going to do an activity where the students can practice what they just learned. This is a simple activity where the students will receive a paper that has various questions on it. Most of these questions are about likes and dislikes. Separate the class into teams of two and tell the students to take turns asking each other the different questions on the questionnaire. If you have time after the activity you can have the teams come up to the front of the class and report what they learned about the other student.

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Related vocabulary game

The next activity we’re going to do is a vocabulary building game. This vocabulary building game will be focusing on adjectives. Go to the board and write the numbers 2 to 10, Jack, Queen, and King. Then next to each number or face card right an adjective. Separate your class into groups of four. Give each group a deck of cards. Then have them play the game “Chase the ace”. This game is based on the card game “go fish”.

Here are the adjectives we are going to practice:

  • Boring
  • Exciting
  • Tall
  • Short
  • Big
  • Small
  • Clean
  • Dirty
  • Safe
  • Dangerous
  • Dumb
  • Smart

 

Homework explanation

At this young age any time that you assign homework you have to make sure that they understand exactly how to do the homework. This means that you have to explain to them each problem very carefully. Here, I’m going to tell them what page they should do for homework and how to do each question.

 

Goodbye

I will tell the students to “cleanup” and that is their cue to know that the class is over. Once they have cleaned up and gotten ready to go I will tell them “Thank you, very much” and they will reply with the same. Then as they are leaving I will say to them “see you later” or “goodbye”.

 

Conclusion

Well, that’s it. Try it out in your next class. Don’t be afraid to make changes. Eventually you will have enough experience to create your own lesson plans that are better suited for your classes and for your students. Good luck.

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Randy League owns an English School in Japan and has been teaching English for 20 years. In his free time he trains MMA , plays video games and studies Japanese.

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